Governance

Academic Policies: Glossary of terms

Further information

University policies

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A

Academic Board
Academic Board is the University's primary academic decision-making and advisory body. It has executive, recommendatory and advisory powers and obligations in relation to academic-related matters as set out in Statute 19, and makes recommendations and provides advice to the Senate and the Vice-Chancellor on such matters. The constitution and membership of the Academic Board are prescribed in regulations made under Statute 19.
Academic Council
The Academic Council is the Executive Committee of the Academic Board.
Academic misconduct
Academic misconduct is any activity or practice engaged in by a student that breaches explicit guidelines relating to the production of work for assessment, in a manner that compromises or defeats the purpose of that assessment. Students must not engage in academic misconduct. Any such activity undermines an ethos of ethical scholarship.
Additional units
Additional units are units which, if undertaken within a course, would result in the student exceeding the minimum number of points required to complete the course.
Advanced standing
Advanced standing means authority to commence a course with credit granted for components of the course in recognition of previously completed formal studies or prior learning.
AEI NOOSR
AEI NOOSR means the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (AEI-NOOSR), within Australian Education International. It manages international qualifications recognition, including educational and professional recognition information services and support.
Alternative examination arrangements
Alternative examination arrangements means arrangements that may be available to: students with disabilities or medical conditions who are registered with UniAccess; students whose religious beliefs prevent them from taking an examination at a specified time; elite athletes; and state and national representatives at sporting and cultural events.
Area of knowledge
An area of knowledge is a group of associated disciplinary fields corresponding to a particular undergraduate pass degree*.
*At UWA the four areas of knowledge are: Arts, Commerce, Design and Science.
AQF
AQF means Australian Qualifications Framework.
Articulation
Articulation means where a course forms part of a sequence of related courses.
Articulated course
An articulated course means a course comprising a sequence of related postgraduate courses in a specific discipline area offering progression from one course level to another with credit granted for all units passed at the appropriate standard that have been completed in or credited towards the course of the previous level in the sequence, or which provides for the award of a relevant lower level qualification where a student has withdrawn from an articulated course having met the requirements of the corresponding lower level course.
Assessment criteria
Assessment criteria specify how markers evaluate students' knowledge, understanding and capabilities, and are based on intended learning outcomes.
Assessment item
Assessment item is a body of work used to gauge student learning, e.g. an essay, project, assignment or examination.
Assessment outcome
Assessment outcome refers to the mark given for an assessment item.
Assessment mechanism statement
Assessment mechanism statement means the details of the way in which the final result for a unit is arrived at.
Assessment task
Assessment task is a piece of work that forms part of an assessment item.
Assured entry pathway
- please note that this has been rebadged 'direct pathway' and the definition is now located under 'D'.
ATAR
ATAR means Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank. The ATAR is a number between 99.95 and zero that reports a student's rank position relative to all other students. In Western Australia, it is constructed on the basis of the Tertiary Entrance Aggregate, which is the sum of a student's best four scaled scores. ATARs in other states are constructed under relevant state rules.
Award
Award means a degree, diploma or certificate of the University.

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B

Bachelor's degree
A bachelor's degree is a qualification awarded on successful completion of an undergraduate course comprising at least three years of undergraduate study. In order to meet the requirements for this degree under the new degree structure (BA, BSc, BDesign, BCom) a student must complete 24 units, of which no more than 12 will be at Level 1 and no fewer than four will be at Level 3. The course must include at least one major and four broadening units of which at least one must be from the approved Category A list. The BPhil (Hons), which is also a bachelor's degree, is a four-year course requiring 32 units.
B.C.C.
B.C.C. stands for British Colour Code, a reference to an extract from a dictionary of colour standards designed for use by government, academia and various industries.
Board of Coursework Studies
The Board of Coursework Studies (BCS) is a standing committee of the Academic Council with a significant central role in ensuring that future courses have educational integrity within the new framework, meet quality assurance standards, and align with the University's strategic directions.
Board of Studies
A Board of Studies (BoS), previously known as Interim Board of Studies (IBoS) has been constituted for each of the following five undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Design, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Philosophy (Hons). The five Boards facilitate course development and decision-making at the inter-faculty level in relation to the new undergraduate courses and make recommendations to the Board of Coursework Studies.
Broadening units
Broadening units are normally offered in one or more areas of knowledge that do not include the area of knowledge of a student's degree, but specific provisions apply in the case of 'Category A' broadening.
Broadway scheme
The Broadway scheme is an alternative admission pathway that makes offers of admission to students from disadvantaged schools who achieve an ATAR of 75-80.

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C

Category A broadening unit
A Category A broadening unit is a broadening unit that:
  1. is a unit that has as its main focus some aspects of the globalised and culturally diverse environment; or
  2. is a Language Other Than English (LOTE) unit; or
  3. is a unit offered by the School of Indigenous Studies; or
  4. is a unit (equivalent to six credit points, that is, 150 hours of student workload) undertaken as part of an approved study abroad or student exchange program for credit and that is wholly taught by and undertaken at the host institution; or
  5. has mathematics and/or statistical theory as its core teaching content, as listed in Schedule 1.
For detail of application in specific circumstances refer to the Handbook.
Category B broadening unit
Category B broadening units comprise potentially all units that faculties are willing to offer to students from across the University, subject to prerequisites being met.
Census date
Census date means the date on which liability for student contribution amounts and tuition fees is calculated other than for commencing international students.
Clinical Master's (Extended)
Clinical Master's (Extended) means a course requiring the equivalent of three years full-time study which provides an opportunity for those with a first professional qualification and professional experience to undertake advanced level supervised clinical practice and research in their professional field. Clinical Master's (Extended) are not Research Training Program (RTP) compliant and consist primarily of advanced coursework.
Complementary unit
A complementary unit is one that has been approved for prescribing as a necessary adjunct to a particular major when this is chosen as a degree-specific major. A student who chooses a second major cannot be compelled to take any complementary units attached to that major. Up to four complementary units may be specified in relation to a major, though many majors have fewer and some prescribe none.
Community benefit sector
Community benefit sector refers to not-for-profit organisations or Government agencies which have advancing the welfare of the community as their primary purpose.
Concurrent enrolment
Concurrent enrolment means enrolling simultaneously in more than one award course.
Conversion course
Conversion course means a course designed to provide knowledge and  skills for those with little or no formal prior study or professional experience in the discipline area of the course.
Conversion unit
Conversion unit means a unit designed to provide knowledge and skills for those with little or no formal prior study or professional experience in the discipline area of the course.
Core unit
Core unit means a unit that is compulsory in a course.
Co-requisite major
Co-requisite major in relation to a nominated major, means a unit that:  
  1. must be undertaken at the same time as the nominated major is undertaken; or
  2. must have been successfully undertaken before the nominated major is undertaken.
Co-requisite unit
Co-requisite unit in relation to another unit, means a unit that:  
  1. must be undertaken at the same time as the other unit is undertaken; or
  2. must have been successfully undertaken before the other unit is undertaken.
Course
Course means a plan of study which a student must successfully undertake before qualifying for a degree, diploma or certificate.
CRICOS code
The Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS) code indicates a registered program offered to international students studying in Australia on a student visa.
Credit transfer
Credit transfer means the process of granting credit for a unit or units up to a specified limit towards an award course of The University of Western Australia on the basis of previous formal studies or prior learning.
Criterion-referenced assessment
Criterion-referenced assessmenti Is one where a student's work is assessed with reference to written criteria derived from learning outcomes.
Cycle 1 courses
Cycle 1 courses are undergraduate degree courses.
Cycle 2 courses
Cycle 2 courses are postgraduate courses, usually requiring two years of full-time study after a Cycle 1 course and leading to a master's degree.
Cycle 3
Cycle 3 courses include the Doctor of Philosophy and more specialised professional doctorates.

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D

Deferral
Deferral is the taking of an authorised 'gap' between being offered a place at the University and commencing studies in the offered course. Deferral for commencing undergraduate students is administered by Admissions.
Degree
A degree is an academic award conferred by the University on a student who has completed the relevant course, or as an honorary distinction.
Degree-specific major
A major becomes a degree-specific major when it determines which degree a student's course belongs to. A student who chooses to take more than one major must designate one of them as degree-specific.
Diploma
Diploma means a course to the value of 48 points comprising the requirements of a major offered in an undergraduate degree course of the University.
Direct pathways
A direct pathway into one of the initial professional postgraduate degrees or to an end-on honours bachelor's degree leading to a provisional or full professional registration which provides a limited number of places, reserved for appropriately qualified students, at the time they are admitted to their undergraduate course at the University, subject to making satisfactory progress and meeting prerequisites as defined in the relevant policies.
Discipline
An academic discipline is a branch of knowledge which is taught and researched at the University. Disciplines are defined, and recognised by the academic journals in which research is published, and the leaned societies and faculties to which their practitioners belong.
Disciplinary field (narrow)
Disciplinary field (narrow) means a branch of an existing field of study (e.g. Chemical Engineering).
Disciplinary field (broad)
Disciplinary field (broad) means a field of study that is taught and researched at the University (e.g. Engineering).
Dissertation
Dissertation means the output of research, which may be wholly in written form or in the form of a composition, performance, exhibition or creative or other approved work. For a Postgraduate Coursework course (AQF Level 9) the output constitutes at least 25 per cent but less than 66.6 per cent of the requirements of the course in question. For Honours (AQF Level 8) the output of research constitutes 50 per cent of the requirements of the course. 
Doctor of Philosophy
A Doctor of Philosophy means a doctoral degree, normally undertaken over a period of four years of full-time studies, and consisting of supervised research that results in the preparation of a thesis that makes a substantial and original contribution to knowledge.

Admission is on the basis of an Honours degree of this University or equivalent (with at least second class honours) or an equivalent demonstrated research capacity. The degree is administered by the Board of the Graduate Research School. Award: Doctor of Philosophy (AQF Level 10).

Domestic applicant
Domestic applicants are citizens or permanent residents of Australia, holders of Australian humanitarian visas, or citizens of New Zealand.
Double major
A double major is an approved discipline-based combination of unit sequences drawn from related fields.
It shares a common Level 1 foundation of two units and may therefore comprise 14 units rather than the 16 that two majors require. The units are spread across Levels 1, 2 and 3, the normal pattern being two units at Level 1, four at Level 2 and eight at Level 3.

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E

Educational Principles (UWA)
UWA Educational Principles comprise a list of academic values that are intended to imbue student learning at all levels and seek to nurture excellence, enable creativity and intellectual exploration, and promote effective citizenship among UWA students and graduates.
EFTSL (equivalent full-time student load)
is a measure of study load. One EFTSL represents a standard full-time load of study and is equivalent to 48 points for a year.
Elective unit
An elective means a unit which a student may choose freely from among the units available in the University subject to the rules which govern the structure of their course and to any unit rules.
Elite athletes
Elite athletes means students identified and recognised as an elite athlete under the Elite Athlete Friendly University Network Agreement.
End-on Honours
End-on Honours means an honours degree course comprising eight standard units (48 points) taken after a student has completed the requirements of an undergraduate pass degree.
Examination
Examinationi Includes end of semester (initial), mid-semester and summer session examinations, tests run by faculties, and practical laboratory examinations, but does not include assignments.
Exchange agreement
Exchange agreement means a formal agreement established between the University and an overseas tertiary institution for a bilateral exchange of students according to agreed protocols which specify number of students, level of study of students, fields of study, timeframes, admission requirements and other details of cooperation.
Exchange period
Exchange period means the duration of the academic program undertaken under the terms of the exchange agreement.
Exchange program
Exchange program is a generic term used to describe the activity which takes place under the framework of all exchange agreements.
Exchange student
Exchange student means a student of the University involved in an exchange program.
Executive master's degree
An executive master's degree is a course normally requiring the equivalent of four semesters of full-time study, and comprising Level 4 and/or Level 5 units (with no more than half taken at Level 4). The course provides an opportunity for those with a first professional qualification and professional experience to pursue further study related to their professional field. Thus, a stated period of work or professional experience is a requirement for entry into such courses. The course may include a research component that represents less than 66.6% of the course requirements. Applicants for the degree by coursework and dissertation are normally required to demonstrate adequate research preparation. Award: Executive Master of XXXX (AQF Level 9).
Exegesis
Exegesis means a critical explanation or interpretation of a text object, manuscript or creative work submitted for examination as the student's honours research dissertation.

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F

Failed Component (FC)
Failed Component (FC) is a component that a student must pass in order to obtain an overall pass in a unit.
Fairway scheme
The Fairway scheme is an alternative admission pathway that addresses the needs of individual students from disadvantaged backgrounds regardless of the school they attend. Eligibility for the Fairway program is determined by students' individual circumstances in relation to a defined set of criteria.
Fee-waiver
Fee-waiver refers to a program where tuition fees are waived at the host institution.
Fee-paying
Fee-paying refers to a program where tuition fees are paid at the host institution.
Final grade
Final grade means the letter code assigned to indicate the level of a student's academic performance in a unit.
Final mark
Final mark means the student's aggregate percentage mark in a unit once any adjustment has been applied.
Formative assessment
Formative assessment is assessment for learning meaning an assessment item or activity that has a developmental purpose with feedback for students about their learning, and may carry a mark.
Formal University examinations
Formal University examinations are those that relate only to text-based written exams and administered by the University via Student Administration within Student Services.

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G

Generic degree course structure
Generic degree course structure means a course which has a standard structure and rules that include at least two specialisations.
Graduate certificate
A graduate certificate is a course requiring the equivalent of half a year of full-time study comprising four Level 4 or Level 5 units. Admission is normally on the basis of a bachelor's degree of this University (or equivalent). A graduate certificate may be the first course in an articulated sequence of courses offering progression from the graduate certificate to the graduate diploma and master's degree. Conversely, a graduate certificate may be an exit course for students enrolled in a master's degree or a graduate diploma course and who, after completing the requirements of the graduate certificate, exit the course. Award: Graduate Certificate in XXXX (AQF Level 8).
Graduate diploma
A graduate diploma is a course requiring the equivalent of one year of full-time study, comprising eight Level 4 or Level 5 units. Direct admission is normally on the basis of a bachelor's degree of this University (or equivalent). Those admitted to the course after fulfilling the requirement of an articulating graduate certificate course are credited with all units completed at the appropriate standard in the articulating course. A graduate diploma may articulate with a master's degree, or may be awarded to students enrolled in master's degree and who, after completing the requirements of the graduate diploma, exit the degree. Award: Graduate Diploma in XXXX (AQF Level 8).

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H

Higher degree by research
A higher degree by research requires a project of supervised but independent enquiry at an advanced level, resulting in the submission of a research thesis (or equivalent production) to be examined by experts in the field.
Higher doctorate
Higher doctorates are postgraduate research degrees with higher standing than either a master's by research degree or a Doctor of Philosophy. They recognise a candidate's published work and merit in a particular field, and are awarded in most cases for work of which the whole or a substantial part has been published or accepted for publication, the form of publication acceptable to be determined in each case by the board of faculty concerned.
Home institution
Home institution means the institution at which the student is enrolled for an award course.
Home-schooled
Home-schooled students are students who have completed their schooling either at home taught by family, or otherwise outside of the mainstream education system.
Honorary doctorate
The University has separate procedures for the award of honorary doctorates to individuals who have been deemed worthy of special recognition, either for scholarly work or for other contributions to higher education or to society.
Honours Courses
Honours Courses are an additional year of study or part-time equivalent after a student's bachelor's degree with a significant research training component of at least half the point value of the honours course.
Host institution
Host institution means the institution where a student from the University undertakes a program or other learning experience.

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I

Including a unit
Including a unit means an exisiting unit is now offered in a major / specialisation in which it is currently not offered.
Incompatible major
An incompatible major, in relation to another major, means a major of which the content is substantially similar to the content of the other major and which must not be undertaken:  
  1. at the same time as the other major is undertaken; or
  2. if the other major has been successfully undertaken.
Incompatible unit
An incompatible unit, in relation to another unit, means a unit the content of which is substantially similar to the content of the other unit and which must not be undertaken:  
  1. at the same time as the other unit is undertaken; or
  2. if the other unit has been successfully undertaken and is being credited to the student's current course.
Independent academic program
Independent academic program means a program at an overseas institution or other place of learning which has been independently initiated by a student of the University where no formal agreement is in place with the University.
International applicants
International applicants are people who are not citizens or permanent residents of Australia or holders of an Australian humanitarian visa or citizens of New Zealand and who are not eligible to be a Commonwealth supported student.
International students
International students means non-Australian resident students studying at the University.
Invigilator
Invigilator means a person who supervises students during an examination.

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K

Knowledge paradigm - effective up to end 2017
A knowledge paradigm is a University-approved statement on the distinctive epistemology corresponding to an undergraduate pass degree. Thus the main focus of an Arts course is on how human beings create, recognise, and negotiate social meanings and values; the main focus of a Commerce course is on factors that drive economic behaviour at individual and organisational levels; the main focus of a Design course is on devising and producing objects, places, spaces and processes; and the main focus of a Science course is on understanding, reasoning about and improving the natural world through systematic observation, experimentation, modelling and calculation.
Knowledge paradigm - effective from 2018
A knowledge paradigm is a University-approved statement on the distinctive epistemology corresponding to an undergraduate pass degree. Thus the main focus of a Bachelor of Arts course is on how human beings create, recognise, and negotiate social meanings and values, places, spaces and processes; the main focus of a Bachelor of Commerce is on factors that drive economic behaviour at individual and organisational levels; the main focus of a Bachelor of Science degree course is on understanding, reasoning about and improving the natural world through systematic observation, experimentation, modelling and calculation; and the main focus of a Bachelor of Biomedical Science degree course is the study of the biological basis of human structure and function and the application of this knowledge to disease, well-being and society.

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L

Language immersion
Language immersion means a program of study specifically for the purpose of language acquisition.
Lapsed student
Lapsed student means a student whose course attempt status has lapsed due to non-enrolment, or who has withdrawn completely from their course and has not been granted approved leave and as a result is classified as having discontinued his or her course
Level of a unit
Level of a unit indicates the amount of prior knowledge required to study the unit successfully.
Level 0 unit
Units at Level 0 are designed for initial bridging purposes. They are not credited towards an undergraduate course.
Level 1 unit
Units at Level 1 can be taken from the beginning of the undergraduate course, subject to meeting prerequisites.
Level 2 unit
Level 2 units can normally be undertaken after Level 1 specified prerequisites have been met.
Level 3 unit
Level 3 units can only be taken after Level 2 specified prerequisites have been met.
LOTE
LOTE means a language other than English
Low socio-economic status
Low socio-economic status (low SES) students are those whose permanent home address postcode is one defined as low SES by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

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M

Major
A major is an approved discipline-based sequence of eight units within an undergraduate degree course.
These units are spread across Levels 1, 2 and 3, the normal pattern being two units at Level 1 and either two at Level 2 and four at Level 3 or three at each of those upper levels.
Making an honours specialisation available
Making an honours specialisation available means the specialisation that was once made unavailable is now available for new enrolments.
Making an honours specialisation unavailable
Making an honours specialisation unavailable means the specialisation is temporarily not offered for new enrolments, but will be offered again at a future date.
Marking keys
Marking keys are an explicit statement about what an assessor expects of students when they respond to a question in an assessment task. They are essential to fair assessment because their proper construction underpins reliability and validity.
Marking rubrics
Marking rubrics is a scoring tool that explicitly represents the performance expectations for an assignment or piece of work. A rubric divides the assigned work into component parts, i.e. criteria, and provides clear descriptions of the characteristics of the work associated with each criterion, at varying levels of mastery. Rubrics can be used for a wide array of assignments: papers, projects, oral presentations, artistic performances, group projects, etc. Rubrics can be used as scoring or grading guides, to provide formative feedback to support and guide ongoing learning efforts, or both.
Marking scheme
Marking scheme, which is made available to students, is an overview of how marks are allocated for an assessment item.
Master's degree course
 Master's degree course mean's a master's degree course by coursework, a master's degree by coursework and dissertation or master's degree by coursework or coursework and dissertation.
Master's degree by research
A course normally requiring the equivalent of two years of full-time study and including a supervised research component that represents at least 66.6 per cent of the course requirements. Students are required to prepare a thesis that is examined by two examiners, at least one of whom must be external to the University. The Board of the Graduate Research School administers the examination of the thesis. Award: Master of Philosophy (AQF Level 9).
Master's degree by thesis and coursework
Master's degree by thesis and coursework means a research degree in which the research represents 66.6% or more but less than 100% of the degree course requirements.
Mature age student
A mature age student is one who is 20 or older in the year of entry at 1 March (for first semester entry) or 1 August (for second semester entry). In the undergraduate course context, mature age students are exempt from the requirement to achieve the WACE.
Moderation of marking
Moderation of marking is a process to ensure consistent, fair and reliable marking against academic standards.

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N

Named degree course structure
Named degree course structure means a course available upon successful completion of a master's course where at least 50% of the required units relate to the narrow disciplinary specified in the degree name.
Negative marking
Negative marking is where a mark(s) is/are deducted for unanswered questions or incorrect answers.
New Courses 2012
- please note that this has been rebadged 'UWA Courses' and the definition is now located under 'U'.
Non-award courses
Non-award courses means courses that do not result in a degree, diploma or certificate established by the Senate, and do not articulate with award courses of the University.
Non-exchange program
Non-exchange program means an international learning experience that is not encompassed as part of the exchange program.
Non-exchange students
Non-exchange students means students who are engaging in overseas experiences recognised by the University, which are not exchange programs.

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O

Offshore students
Offshore students means students of the University studying outside Australia.
Option
Option means a unit chosen from among a range of given options.
Overload
Overload means to enrol in units with a total credit point value greater than 48 points in a year, or greater than 24 points in a semester, or the equivalent calculated on a proportional basis for a teaching period other than a semester.

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P

PhD
PhD is the Doctor of Philosophy degree course.
Postgraduate coursework
Postgraduate coursework refers to a course of study that leads to the award of a graduate certificate, graduate diploma, Cycle 2 professional qualification or other master's degree by coursework.
Prerequisite unit
A prerequisite unit, in relation to another unit, means a unit that must be successfully undertaken before the other unit may be undertaken.
Prior learning
Prior learning in the context of recognised prior learning (RPL) means:
  1. learning acquired in a credentialed context (that is one that is qualified through assessment) other than in a University or other higher education institution ; or
  2. learning acquired in an uncredentialed context such as through work experience or life experience
Prize
Prize means a sum of money or a specified article awarded to a student, normally for academic achievement while studying for a degree, diploma or certificate of the University.
Professional doctorate
Professional doctorate is RTS compliant and embodies an original contribution to knowledge by way of a research thesis (for example, through the discovery of new knowledge, the formulation of theories or the innovative re-interpretation of known data and established ideas). It can include up to one third of coursework offered at master's level or beyond and provides an opportunity for those with a first professional qualification and professional experience to undertake advanced studies and research in their professional fields. The thesis is concerned primarily with deducing implications for practice and policy, while not neglecting the possibility of testing theory, extending existing theory, or developing new theory.
Professional experience
Professional experience means experience obtained through the practice of a profession and from which the professional competency or learning outcomes achieved can be assessed.
Professional practice master's degree
A professional practice master's degree is a course normally requiring the equivalent of two years of full-time study post a bachelor's degree and comprising Level 4 and Level 5 units (with not more than half taken at Level 4), and which equips a student to enter a profession. Admission is on the basis of a bachelor's degree of this University (or equivalent) and may involve a sequential pathway (including a specified undergraduate major). In some cases applicants are required to have undertaken a specific undergraduate major or majors of this University, or equivalent. This degree is the first professional qualification for those entering Architecture, Engineering and Social Welfare in the new course framework. Award: Master of XXXX (AQF Level 9).
Professional practice master's (extended)
A professional practice master's (extended) is a course normally requiring the equivalent of at least three years of full-time study post a bachelor's degree and comprising Level 4 and Level 5 units. Admission is on the basis of a degree of this University or equivalent and may involve a sequential pathway (including a specified undergraduate major). The degree is the first professional qualification for those entering into Medicine, Dentistry, Law, and Podiatric Medicine. Though consisting predominantly of coursework, these courses are named Professional Practice Master’s (Extended) on the basis of the duration of study required and established international nomenclature. Award: Doctor of... or in case of Law the award: Juris Doctor (AQF Level 9).
Program
Program means an academic course of study or experiential learning activity for more than one student and includes exchange and non-exchange programs.

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R

Relevant board
Relevant board means a board relevant to the case in point. The relevant board may include a position or a body of people with authority to carry out the function concerned.
Relevant faculty or board
Relevant faculty or board means the faculty or board responsible for administering the student's course and includes a position or body of people with authority to carry out the function concerned.
Removing a unit
Removing a unit means the unit continues to be offered but not in certain specialisations.
Rescission of an honours specialisation
Rescission of an honours specialisation means the honours specialisation is not offered for new enrolments and is discontinued.
Research output
Research output means the production of work that may be wholly in written form or in the form of a composition, performance, exhibition or creative or other approved work.
Research Training Program (RTP)
Research Training Program is a performance-based funding program administered by the Federal Department of Education and Training. Domestic students under the Research Training Program are exempt from paying student contributions and tuition fees, if UWA so decides. Research Training Program courses consist of master's and doctoral courses whose research component is at least 66.6 per cent of the total course.
Responsible organisational entity
A responsible organisational entity (usually a school) has the role of designing, coordinating and/or teaching a unit.
Result of Failed Component (FC)
Result of FC (Failed Component) is the final result for a unit in which a student has achieved a mark of at least 50 but of which the student has failed a component that must be passed in order to pass the unit.
Rural students
Rural students are those who have completed their senior secondary qualification at an Australian school situated more than 75 kilometres from their state capital city general post office.

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S

Second major
A second major is any major that is not degree-specific. While every undergraduate course leading to a bachelor's degree must include a degree-specific major, a student may also choose to include a second major, either from within the same area of knowledge or from outside it. Any requirement to undertake complementary units is applicable only to the degree-specific major, not the second major.
Scholarship
Scholarship means a sum of money awarded to a student to cover or contribute towards the costs associated with studying for a degree, diploma or certificate of the University.
Service learning
Service learning refers to community engagement activities that are embedded in units of study, being structured and assessed as formal educational experiences.
Short-term academic program
Short-term academic program means a program of less than one semester established under the framework of a formal agreement and managed through the faculty for credit towards a student’s course at the University. The programs may take place under the terms of a bilateral exchange agreement or a unilateral (one-way) agreement. 
Single major
A single major is an approved discipline-based sequence of eight units within an undergraduate degree course. These units are spread across Levels 1, 2 and 3, the normal pattern being two units at Level 1, two at Level 2 and four at Level 3.
Specialisation
A specialisation designates a particular discipline chosen from within a wider field of study (e.g. Chemical Engineering within Engineering). It is usually applied to the chosen disciplinary focus of an honours or postgraduate course (e.g. as a distinctive variant within a generic master's course), but in a few cases may refer to a set of specialised units within an undergraduate course major.
STAT
STAT is the Special Tertiary Admissions Test and comprises a series of tests designed to assess a range of competencies considered important to success in university study.
Special Unit
A unit approved by a quick approval process for one teaching period in limited circumstances.
Standard full-time duration
Standard full-time duration refers to three years for a bachelor pass degree and four years for a bachelor honours degree.
Student adviser
Student adviser means the position with responsibility for providing advice in relation to the University rules and policies that apply to the student concerned and may be called the Sub-Dean, Associate Dean, Student Adviser, Faculty Administrative Officer or Senior Faculty Administrative Officer.
Student categories
Student categories means the following: Commonwealth-supported, domestic fee-paying, international student visa holders and international students (non-visa holders).
Student visa holder
Student visa holder is a student who is not an Australian citizen nor a permanent resident of Australia nor a New Zealand citizen and who has a student visa.
Study plan
Study plan means documentation of agreement between the student and the relevant faculty that states the University credit and/or recognition to be awarded upon successful completion of an overseas program of study.
Summative assessment
Summative assessment is assessment of learning meaning any assessment that contributes to the final grade/mark of a unit to provide a measure of student performance in relation to the learning outcomes and assessment criteria.
Summer session
Summer session means a teaching period during the summer vacation.

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T

Teaching period
A teaching period is a scheduled duration, within an academic year, in which a unit of study is offered and includes approved non-teaching study breaks, pre-examination study breaks and examination periods.
Tertiary study
Tertiary study is study at Australian Qualifications Framework Diploma Level 5 or above, undertaken as part of a recognised award course / is any formal study as accredited under the Australian Qualifications Framework undertaken at the level of Diploma or above.
Thesis
Thesis means the output of research in a course in which the output constitutes more than 66.6 per cent per cent of the requirements of the course in question.
The University
The University is/means the University of Western Australia.
TISC
TISC is the Western Australian Tertiary Institutions Services Centre.
Transition period
Transition period means the period during which students in courses that do not form part of New Courses 2012 can complete their courses in accordance with the relevant rules and policies.
Transitioning students
Transitioning students means students who were enrolled in a course at the University prior to 2012 and who are admitted into one of the University's new undergraduate degree courses.

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U

UK NARIC
UK NARIC is the National Recognition Information Centre for the United Kingdom. It provides an official, international source of comparison information and advice on international education and training systems and overseas skills and qualifications.
Unattached elective
An unattached elective is a unit approved for elective purposes that is not part of a major sequence of an undergraduate degree course.
 
Undergraduate degree course
Undergraduate degree course means an undergraduate pass degree course or the Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours) degree course.
Unit
A unit is a discrete component of study normally representing 150 hours of student workload, including contact hours, personal study and examinations. It is equivalent to 6 points of credit. By special approval, some units may have a value that is a multiple of 6 points.
Unit set
A unit set refers to a sequence of units within a course (for example, a major or a specialisation).
Unique unit
Unique unit means a unit that is unique to a narrow disciplinary field, and must not appear among the core units of more than one named master's degree course, or among the specialisation units of more than one specialisation within a generic master's degree course.
University working day
University working day means a weekday other than one that is specified by the University as a University holiday.
UWA Courses
UWA Courses are undergraduate or postgraduate degree courses introduced in 2012 which conform to the structural requirements adopted as a result of the UWA Course Structures Review. 
UWA Educational Principles
UWA Educational Principles comprise a list of academic values that are intended to imbue student learning at all levels and seek to nurture excellence, enable creativity and intellectual exploration, and promote effective citizenship among UWA students and graduates.
 
UWA Extension
UWA Extension is a provider of adult and continuing education in Western Australia and part of the community and cultural outreach of The University of Western Australia.

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W

WACE
WACE is the Western Australian Certificate of Education.
Work Experience
Work experience means experience obtained either in a general setting or in a professional setting that need not lead to specific competency or learning outcomes. Work experience may constitute grounds for admission to courses in part, but such experience must not provide grounds for credit.
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