Governance

How to become a committee member

Some staff are interested in becoming members of committees, but find it difficult to get on to a committee to which they feel they can contribute effectively.

If you're in this position, the following tips might be of help.

  1. Contributing to committees of which you are already a member
  2. Getting information on the University's committees
  3. Registering your interest with the Executive Officer
  4. Reading calls for nomination on all-staff emails
  5. Preparing nomination statements
  6. Lobbying voters
  7. Opportunities on working parties and project management groups

Contributing to committees of which you are already a member

Participate actively in any committees/bodies of which you already have membership - for example School committees, faculties. If you are an effective committee member of these committees this is likely to be noticed and your name may come up when the Chairs/ Executive Officers of other committees take advice (for example, from Deans, Faculty Administrative Officers) on possible names for nomination for vacancies. 

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Getting information on the University's committees

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Registering your interest with the Executive Officer

If you're interested in nominating for a future vacancy, make this known to the Executive Officer who will then be able to tell you when a vacancy will next occur and how you can nominate for it.

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Reading calls for nomination on all-staff emails

Read the calls for nomination which appear as all-staff email messages from time to time. (e.g. for Senate and Academic Board). Such calls are normally headed "Call for nominations for the." and have nomination forms attached, with details of deadlines for submission.

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Preparing nomination statements

If you're required to submit a statement in support of a nomination, take some care over this. Think through why you want to be on the committee and what you can offer, and set out your claim succinctly. Vague, ill-thought out nomination statements don't encourage voters.

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Lobbying voters

Once you've nominated for a position, lobby anyone you know who is qualified to vote in the election. Tell them why you want to be on the committee and what you think you have to offer, and ask them to consider voting for you. 

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Opportunities on working parties and project management groups

From time to time positions on working parties and project management groups arise. Such bodies normally meet for specific tasks over a limited period. If you have a particular expertise to offer, you might wish to make this known to the senior administrative officer in the area most closely associated with your expertise, as this individual is likely to be aware of any possible openings.

Don't be tempted to take on too much if you're unsure how much time committee work will take you. Some committees are very time-consuming for conscientious members - and there is little point in being on a committee if you do not intend to give effective service. Ask the Executive Officer of any committee you are thinking of nominating for to give you an estimate of the total time you're likely to have to commit to it.

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